What are 2 biodiversity hotspots?

What are the 3 biodiversity hotspots?

Here’s a look at 6 biodiversity hotspots of India

  • Indo-Burma region. …
  • Western Ghats. …
  • Sundaland. …
  • Sunderbans.

What are the examples of biodiversity hotspot?

What is a Biodiversity Hotspot?

  • Atlantic Forest – Brazil, Paraguay, Argentina, Uruguay.
  • Polynesia-Micronesia, Southern Pacific Ocean.
  • Cerrado – Brazil.
  • Himalaya – Nepal, Bhutan, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Myanmar, China.
  • Cape Floral Region – South Africa.
  • Coastal Forests – Eastern Africa.

What is biodiversity hotspot Class 10?

The Biodiversity Hotspot is a biogeographical area that is both a major source of biodiversity and is threatened with destruction. In general, the word biodiversity hotspot relates to 25 high biodiversity areas of the planet that have lost at least 70% of their original habitat.

What are the 4 types of biodiversity?

Four Types of Biodiversity

  • Species Diversity. Every ecosystem contains a unique collection of species, all interacting with each other. …
  • Genetic Diversity. Genetic diversity describes how closely related the members of one species are in a given ecosystem. …
  • Ecosystem Diversity. …
  • Functional Diversity.

What is a hotspot?

A WiFi hotspot is a wireless access point that you can connect to to use Internet connection. … There are also mobile hotspots — you can share your cellular data from an iPhone or Android, just as if they were a wireless router, and others can connect to it to get online.

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What are some examples of biodiversity?

Most people recognize biodiversity by species—a group of individual living organisms that can interbreed. Examples of species include blue whales, white-tailed deer, white pine trees, sunflowers, and microscopic bacteria that can’t even be seen by the naked eye.

Where are hotspots?

A frequently-used hypothesis suggests that hotspots form over exceptionally hot regions in the mantle, which is the hot, flowing layer of the Earth beneath the crust. Mantle rock in those extra-hot regions is more buoyant than the surrounding rocks, so it rises through the mantle and crust to erupt at the surface.